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I N T E RV I E W UCLA Health System is Going Electronic This will allow integration of inpatient and outpatient clinical records with appointments, registration, billing and other patient- related business functions throughout UCLA Health System. UCLA Health System will begin rolling out its electronic-health-record program on March 1, 2013. This will allow integration of inpatient and outpatient clinical records with appointments, registration, billing and other patient-related business functions throughout UCLA Health System. Physicians, pharmacists, nurses and other clinicians and staff members will use the system. Janet P. Pregler, M.D., a UCLA physician and member of the electronic-health-record Executive Oversight Board, discussed how patients will benefit from the new electronic environment. What are the major changes with the new system? For many years, UCLA has had a partial electronic medical-record system. When patients come to see their primary-care physician, that physician has computer access to the patient’s hospital records, laboratory tests and notes from consultants. But the new system will take that to another level. From the patient’s perspective, there are two major changes. Through a secure e-mail and Web portal called MyUCLAHealth, which will become available in the summer, patients will have the ability to communicate Janet P. Pregler, M.D WWW.UCLAHEALTH.ORG 1-800-UCLA-MD1 (1-800-825-2631) electronically with their doctor’s office for things like making appointments, checking on the status of referrals and obtaining laboratory results. A second big change is that all of our physicians will be documenting office visits electronically in real time, as opposed to the traditional method of writing it in a chart or dictating it after the patient leaves. Finally, at the end of each visit, patients will receive a printed after-visit summary that will include their doctor’s recommendations as well as information about referrals, new medications and other areas of follow-up. How does all of this enhance the quality of care for patients? It will improve the information that physicians have available to them at the time of the visit, and enable them to more thoroughly record what they learn during the visit. When I go in the room to see a